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Many people don’t fully understand the details of LASIK eye surgery, even those who are undergoing or about to undergo the procedure. Don’t be someone who waits until afterwards to discover the things you should have known beforehand. Be an informed consumer, especially with something as important as your vision.

If you have decided to go ahead and have laser eye surgery then you are likely to have been offered the option of having Intralase. Intralase is the latest development in laser eye surgery and is a type of Lasik and is so called Intralase Lasik. Intralase Lasik is considered the gold standard in laser eye surgery and this is because of the many benefits it has over standard Lasik. Intralase is different to standard Lasik in the way in which the flap is created. During standard Lasik the flap (outer layer of cornea) is created using a microkeratome (surgical blade) whereas with Intralase it is created using a laser. The creation of the flap is required so that the surgeon can access the inner layers of your cornea which are to be lasered during the procedure. Intralase is so called a bladeless procedure and is becoming increasing popular. Let's look at its advantages and see if it is worth the additional cost:

Risks/complications: There are fewer complications when compared with standard Lasik as the flap that is created is much more precise and cleaner. The vast majority of complications with Lasik are flap related.

Dry Eyes: There is less of a chance of getting dry eyes if you have Intralase.

Recovery Time: Recovery time is quicker than compared with standard Lasik and vision stabilises sooner as well.

Results: Having Intralase gives you a greater chance of achieving 20:20 vision following surgery. It not only improves the quantity of your vision (how far you can see down the test chart) but it also improves the quality of your vision, meaning you are less likely to have night vision problems following surgery.

Laser enhancement: Fewer people having Intralase need a re-treatment down the line meaning there is a higher chance your laser vision correction will last for life.

Thinner Flap: This means the people with thin corneas could be able to have Intralase Lasik, where they were unsuitable for standard Lasik.

As you can see there are a lot of advantages of Intralase and it is definitely worth having it if you can afford the additional cost. You are more likely to achieve 20:20 vision with a lower risk of complications.

If you are interesed in laser eye surgery then visit treatmentsaver.com to find out everything you need to know about the procedure. You can ask questions in the laser eye surgery forum if there is anything you are unsure about.

Pursuing a Career in Ophthalmology

The following are the pros and cons behind two of the most common misconceptions about LASIK.

1. “After the procedure, I’ll never need glasses or contacts again!”

Depending on your age at the time of the procedure and the issues with your vision that you’re trying to correct, you may or may not continue to need glasses or contacts, either immediately after surgery or possibly later on, as you age.

This is not to say that the procedure can’t be both effective and life-changing. It can be, and it generally is. The vast majority of patients who undergo the procedure report significant improvement in their vision.

It allows California drivers to drive without glasses within days of their surgery. A small percentage require “enhancement” surgery, which is a second procedure, conducted to fix any over- or under-correction of your vision resulting from the first procedure.

Also, many people, as they age (generally between the ages of 40 and 50), develop poor vision for reading (called presbyopia). If you had LASIK surgery in California prior to developing presbyopia, you could still need reading glasses as you get older. Presbyopia is sometimes treated with Monovision LASIK, which corrects one eye for distance vision and the other eye for close vision.

How to choose a LASIK Eye surgeon in California

The incidence of laser eye surgery complication is minimal however, if you're considering the procedure then you need to be aware of what they are as part of your preparation process.

The percentage of people who suffer corneal infection following surgery is less than one per cent. Delayed healing will be a hindrance to recovering patients but the long term effects with proper post operative treatment are almost negligible.

In this article, we'll highlight some of the most common laser eye surgery complications.

- Under or over correction probably heads the list of complications. This simply means a surgeon can't predict accurately the response of your eyes to treatment and you will be required to continue wearing protective eye wear following the procedure. In more severe cases, further surgery could be required.

- Corneal haze is common and related to PRK(Photorefractive Keratectomy). It's considered a common aspect of the recovery process and shouldn't effect one's vision after complete recovery. Corneal haze risk is not as common with patients who undergo lasik treatment.

- An annoying complication revolves around a condition known as regression. Simply put, despite the procedure, the eye returns to it's pre-operative state and depending on the patients risk factor, may require another operation.

- The halo effect is another annoying aspect of both PRK and lasik procedures yet it can be serious in some circumstances. A halo effect is a worrying complication for patients especially for those driving at night.

- Lasik patients could be prone to a laser eye surgery complication known as flap damage. In other words, a supposed hinged flap created on the center of the cornea could unexpectedly be dis-lodged. This will present problems if it's damaged and while it can be replaced following the treatment, this is not always 100% certain.

- The flap could also become distorted to the extent it could affect to some degree a patient's best corrected vision.

While risks are always present with any type of surgical procedure, the chances of suffering any major laser eye surgery complication are extremely low.

Surgeons may be reluctant to operate on patients who are considered a risk in the pre-operative stage. While this may sound harsh it's simple logic and the patients well-being is not going to be compromised.

Benefits of Intralase Laser Eye Surgery

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Many people don't fully understand the details of LASIK eye surgery, even those who are undergoing or about to undergo the procedure. Don't be someone who waits until afterwards to discover the things you should have known beforehand. Be an informed consumer, especially with something as important as your vision.

The following are the pros and cons behind two of the most common misconceptions about LASIK.

1. "After the procedure, I'll never need glasses or contacts again!"

Depending on your age at the time of the procedure and the issues with your vision that you're trying to correct, you may or may not continue to need glasses or contacts, either immediately after surgery or possibly later on, as you age.

This is not to say that the procedure can't be both effective and life-changing. It can be, and it generally is. The vast majority of patients who undergo the procedure report significant improvement in their vision.

It allows them to drive without glasses within days of their surgery. A small percentage require "enhancement" surgery, which is a second procedure, conducted to fix any over- or under-correction of your vision resulting from the first procedure.

Also, many people, as they age (generally between the ages of 40 and 50), develop poor vision for reading (called presbyopia). If you had LASIK surgery prior to developing presbyopia, you could still need reading glasses as you get older. Presbyopia is sometimes treated with Monovision LASIK, which corrects one eye for distance vision and the other eye for close vision.

However, even patients with Monovision are counseled to keep glasses on hand for those times when perfect distance or close vision or good depth perception (which requires both eyes) is necessary.

For most people, eye surgery reduces their use of glasses to only very specific situations and specialty vision needs, but it doesn't remove the need for corrective lenses all together.

2. "LASIK wouldn't be so common if it were risky."

LASIK is surgery, and all surgeries come with certain risks. More than one million people had the procedure in the United States in 2006, and less than 1% of those patients experienced significant complications. This means that statistically, your chances of having an experience without significant complications are very, very good.

However, given that this is surgery on your eyes, and your eyes play a vital role in your everyday life, the risks are something you want to be aware of and take into consideration when deciding what's right for you.

Possible complications range from minor (and temporary) increases in dry eye symptoms, to visually debilitating and permanent dry eye symptoms. A small percentage of patients lose vision at specific distances, which cannot be fixed with any kind of corrective lenses or follow-up surgery. Another small percentage of patients develop glare, halos, or double vision. For some, these problems are permanent, and Unfortunately, they're especially noticeable in challenging visual situations, such as at night or in fog.

According to the American Academy of Ophthalmology, LASIK eye surgery is safe and effective for most corrections. (The worse your vision is prior to surgery, the less likely that this surgery is right for you.) Many ophthalmologists believe that the risks of long-term contact lens use may exceed the risk of LASIK, although the fact that the surgery has been around for less than 2 decades means that the long-term effects can not yet be known.

Conclusion

In general, the thing to keep in mind is that almost all LASIK patients end up with improved vision and good results. However, those who experience complications tend to be VERY unhappy (and vocal) about it, because our vision and our eyes play a central role in our lives. You don't get your money back (generally) whether your vision is better or worse after surgery.

You shouldn't let a vocal unhappy minority convince you that LASIK eye surgery is terrible, any more than you should let slick marketing campaigns convince you that it's risk-free. Carefully discuss the visual situations you hope to correct, your various expectations, and all potential risks and complications with your surgeon in a consultation prior to surgery. And, as with any major medical procedure, it's wise to get a second opinion.


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